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Saudi plane turns back to airport after mother forgets baby
https://www.scmp.com/news/world/middle-east/article/3001376/saudi-plane-turns-back-airport-after-mother-forgets-baby

Two thumbs up to the pilot, ground controller and common sense
Cannot imagine what sort of response that 'mother' must have provoked, but I guess we must (at the very least) give her credit for crying out for help in face of consequent embarrassment/inconveniences :)

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https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a27481869/b-52-boneyard/

 

The U.S. Air Force has returned a B-52 bomber retired eleven years ago to active duty service, only the second time in history that has happened. The bomber, nicknamed “Wise Guy,” was brought out of storage at the aircraft “Boneyard” in Arizona, refurbished, and returned to service at Barksdale, Louisiana. The bomber could easily spend another two or three decades on active duty.

“Wise Guy”, a B-52H bomber, was retired in 2008 and sent to the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group at Davis-Monathan Air Force Base in Arizona. The facility, known as “the Boneyard”, is home to over 4,000 military aircraft in various states of storage. The hot, dry air of the southwestern desert prevents stored aircraft from developing rust or other corrosion issues. Some aircraft are stored for quick recall, while others are in pieces and slowly stripped of parts to support active duty planes.

Wise Guy was stored for a relatively quick return to service if needed. The War Zone blog states that the bomber will replace a B-52H that crashed and burned in 2015 at Andersen Air Force Base, on the island of Guam. Bringing the bomber back from Arizona will boost the B-52 fleet back to the desired number of 76 aircraft.

According to a local Baton Rouge, Louisiana news report, the bomber is destined for the 307th Bomb Wing, an Air Force Reserve unit that flies both the B-1B and B-52 bombers.

Not all B-52s are capable of carrying nuclear weapons, but it appears Wise Guy will operate in the nuclear role. The report states that the 307th includes “nuclear certified combat squadrons”, and the B-1B no longer carries nuclear weapons. A recent Federation of American Scientists report says the B-52H no longer carries nuclear gravity bombs but still carries the Air Launched Cruise Missile armed with the W80-1 thermonuclear warhead. The W80-1 has a variable yield of 5 or 150 kilotons’ explosive force.

According to The War Zone the bomber was flown back from Arizona to Louisiana with the same MT tail code that it had when retired in Minot Air Force Base in 2008. The aircraft missed some upgrades in the eleven years it has been out of service and will need to be brought to the latest configuration before going back onto active duty. The bomber also sported some graffiti left behind by the previous crew or maintainers when the giant bomber was retired.

 

 

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Airlines worldwide are diverting flights away from southern Iran, lengthening travel times, after the Federal Aviation Administration issued an edict barring American operators from the region amid escalating tensions with the Persian Gulf country.


Deutsche Lufthansa AG, Dutch carrier KLM and Qantas Airways Ltd of Australia are among carriers re-routing long-haul services to avoid the Strait of Hormuz, where the U.S. has blamed Iran for attacks on shipping and an American drone was shot down on Wednesday. United Airlines suspended flights between Newark, New Jersey, and Mumbai that regularly pass over the area.



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KLIA actually already has something similar, called FastTrack. Haven't used so can't comment though

 

http://www.myairportfasttrack.com/services/

 

At those rates, unsure where it is feasible for it to be a perk for premium credit card members (assuming is free).

 

It's actually a pretty cool service as you actually get to pass through customs/security through a totally separate route.

 

If you notice when you take the escalator down after entering domestic airside at KLIA, you will see a floor in between - that's where this service takes you through.

Edited by jani

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KLIA actually already has something similar, called FastTrack. Haven't used so can't comment though

 

http://www.myairportfasttrack.com/services/

 

At those rates, unsure where it is feasible for it to be a perk for premium credit card members (assuming is free).

 

It's actually a pretty cool service as you actually get to pass through customs/security through a totally separate route.

 

If you notice when you take the escalator down after entering domestic airside at KLIA, you will see a floor in between - that's where this service takes you through.

 

Is this new? If it's not, then it's not well publicized.

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Relatively new. Less than a year if I recall.

 

This effort isn't related to my team per se (although this idea was actually adopted from our Istanbul airport), but I think the lack of major publicity is to ensure it runs smoothly first before marketing it properly.

 

Just my thoughts though.

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Recent incident over attire highlights the ambiguity in airline dress codes

Add rompers to the list of clothes that can potentially get you yanked from a flight. That garment joins baggy pants, short skirts, low-cut blouses, sheer skirts, leggings and crop tops — to name a few — in the catalog of items that have been flagged as problematic by airline employees who either forced passengers to cover up or get off a plane in recent years.
Tisha Rowe, a Houston doctor, found herself at this intersection of unclear policy and overzealous enforcement during an American Airlines flight from Jamaica to Miami late last month, when she said a flight attendant told her she couldn’t fly without covering her one-piece shorts-and-strapless-top set. Without a jacket handy, she said, she was ultimately forced to put a blanket over her outfit so she could take the flight with her 8-year-old son, who was in tears after the interaction; she has retained an attorney. The airline apologized this week and said it issued a refund of her fare, though Rowe says she has yet to receive it.
How can passengers avoid these predicaments? Are there clear dress codes provided by airlines upfront? In most cases, the answer is: absolutely not.
Airlines could become a fashion police.

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KLIA actually already has something similar, called FastTrack. Haven't used so can't comment though

 

http://www.myairportfasttrack.com/services/

 

At those rates, unsure where it is feasible for it to be a perk for premium credit card members (assuming is free).

 

It's actually a pretty cool service as you actually get to pass through customs/security through a totally separate route.

 

If you notice when you take the escalator down after entering domestic airside at KLIA, you will see a floor in between - that's where this service takes you through.

 

Effective this week sadly immigration have suspended the fast track lanes for this service and the airline cards due to "unavoidable issues". If your boarding pass doesn't say First or Business then you need to use the other queues.

 

As a foreigner this means frequent long slow queues looking at understaff counters.

 

Very angry about this

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Qantas Airways Ltd. will run marathon ghost flights from New York to Sydney carrying just a few staff to see how the human body holds up as the airline prepares for unprecedented non-stop services.

 

Qantas said Thursday it will simulate the worlds longest direct commercial flight twice with a Boeing Co. Dreamliner as soon as October. The payload of 40 passengers and crew, most of them employees, will undergo medical checks and assessments. Another plane will test the London-to-Sydney route.

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-08-22/new-york-sydney-ghost-flights-to-test-if-human-body-can-bear-it?srnd=premium-asia

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This is research for their Project Sunrise.

 

It is a good idea to use delivery flights to simulate their Project Sunrise routes so that they can get some advance data.

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This is research for their Project Sunrise.

 

It is a good idea to use delivery flights to simulate their Project Sunrise routes so that they can get some advance data.

What sort of data are they trying to collect here? These flights are only marginally longer than what the likes of SQ, QR and EK already offer. QF itself is no stranger to ULR flights. I am also not sure how useful the data will be if they use 787s (with only 40 people onboard, lest we forget) which will not even operate those Project Sunrise flights.

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A tale of two Sydneys – when travel plans take tourists to the wrong place with the right name


If one of the several San Joses or two Stockholm airports is your destination, going astray is a distinct possibility


In Sydney, Nova Scotia, an Australia-bound traveller turns up, lost and confused, at least once a year




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The Hidden World of Invitation-Only Airline Clubs
If you have to ask, you probably don’t belong.
Private invitation-only airport lounges behind unmarked doors, the lofty privileges and perks that come with “Very VIP status” — welcome to the world of the high-flying elite. That roster includes politicians and unelected power-brokers, A-list celebrities and the upper ranks of the largest companies.
They probably don’t travel anywhere near as much as a top-tier frequent flyer, but who needs a platinum airline membership card when yours is a coveted and rarely-seen black one?

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-09-06/the-hidden-world-of-invitation-only-airline-clubs?srnd=premium-asia

 

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