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Not So Important News On Aviation


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#21 KK Lee

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 02:45 PM

Before Debbie Winsett boarded a recent Delta Air Lines flight from Minneapolis to Washington, a flight attendant added a surprise restriction to her ticket.

While waiting to board, an agent announced that a passenger had a nut allergy and we should refrain from using or eating any nut products on the flight, says Winsett, a real estate manager from Visalia, Calif. Though I empathize with the allergic traveler, there were several comments from passengers who had bought or brought food containing nuts, and many wondered if they had to comply.

https://www.washingt...m=.382e4f8f269e

Guess the end of mh kacang masim is in sight.

Edited by KK Lee, 05 August 2018 - 02:47 PM.


#22 Alif A. F.

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 01:46 PM

http://www.freemalay...urges-airlines/

Good suggestion but...

#23 Mohd Suhaimi Fariz

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 02:19 PM

 

Why not develop proper roads instead?



#24 Waiping

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 04:22 PM

Roads in Sabah & Sarawak are different in a sense that there is no direct route cutting through mountainous region to reach the other side.  Widening road also not possible in most places as these roads were carved on the hillside.

 

Currently a drive from Kota Kinabalu to Sandakan takes around 5 hours, then another 3 or so to Tawau.  Mind you most Chinese tourist now goes to Semporna via flight to Tawau.  Both Tawau and Sandakan airports has seen expansion on the runway and terminal recently and maybe they should expand it again to cater for more flights.  More flight means (hopefully) cheaper price.

 

Moving forward perhaps to allow foreign airlines direct flight to Tawau to increase competition.



#25 Alif A. F.

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 07:44 PM

Roads in Sabah and Sarawak at most designed as JKR's R3 standard with minor section up until R5 standard in more populated areas. There are six standards of road design in malaysia with highest as R6 e.g. PLUS highway.

Back to flights, if using upgraded Pan Borneo highway can reduce driving time from KK to Sandakan to just 3-4 hours, I believe demand for flights to SDK would be affected, but TWU would be much less. There are some tourists who prefer rent a vehicle and drive to the east coast rather than flying.

#26 Samuel Chy

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 10:34 AM

if driving from Kota Kinabalu town area to Tawau Town by the shortest route, Via Keningau/Maliau Basin/Kalabakan, which is around 480km iirc, it took at least 7hrs non stop driving, within the speed of 90km/h. so if Pan Borneo is built, it might cut short the travelling time, BUT as a tourist, they wont wiling to spend 5hrs on the road, just to tawau for Semporna (which is another 1hr from tawau, or fastest 45mins). not to say all, but most. 



#27 Waiping

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 01:43 PM

That road was previously used by timber companies to transport their logs.  Only in recent year was the road "upgraded".  Hardly a scenic route.  I can imagine you sleep thru the 4 hours drive, but a flight from BKI takes 45 minutes.



#28 Samuel Chy

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 02:03 PM

That road was previously used by timber companies to transport their logs.  Only in recent year was the road "upgraded".  Hardly a scenic route.  I can imagine you sleep thru the 4 hours drive, but a flight from BKI takes 45 minutes.

 

indeed it's a logging road last time, and get better surfaced recent years. iirc it's open "officially" less than 8 years for full pavement. but the enjoyable part only from KK-some where Nabawan. further up you will need very alert, as might run into a pothole, rocky surface, or "air-pocket" out of sudden. due to high logging trucks moving around. all the way to Kalabakan. from Kalabakan to Tawau is better, but still anytime you will encounter some rocky surface or uneven, due to the Oil Palm plantation trucks movements. 

plus, there's no signal on ur cellphones somewhere after Nabawan, up till Maliau Basin you can get some (if lucky enough), then continue the silent phones till kalabakan/ or close to tawau.



#29 Alif A. F.

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 02:20 PM

Passenger blasts airline that served him raw chicken and didn’t replace it

 

https://www.news.com...13f4a261a10535b

 

____________

 

Not to belittle his complaint, but could it be that the chicken skewer is really a satay? And the 'raw' and 'pink' as in the photos were exaggerated and interpreted as such by someone of different culture or background? Just my thought...



#30 KK Lee

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 04:01 PM

Passenger blasts airline that served him raw chicken and didnt replace it
 
https://www.news.com...13f4a261a10535b
 
____________
 
Not to belittle his complaint, but could it be that the chicken skewer is really a satay? And the 'raw' and 'pink' as in the photos were exaggerated and interpreted as such by someone of different culture or background? Just my thought...


Chicken looks raw. For food safety, chicken is not supposed to serve pink in mass produced airlines foods.

If mh or it's supplier couldn't find where was the failure in haccp mean it may happen again.

#31 Alif A. F.

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 04:23 PM

Chicken looks raw. For food safety, chicken is not supposed to serve pink in mass produced airlines foods.

If mh or it's supplier couldn't find where was the failure in haccp mean it may happen again.

 

Ok, I see.



#32 KK Lee

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 10:45 PM

Cathay Pacific spells own name wrong on new plane

https://ichef.bbci.c...thaypacific.jpg

#33 Mushrif A

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 06:48 AM

Its not a new plane

#34 Kee Hooi Yen

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 07:09 AM

Heard the paint job was done in China.
Could this be the simplified version of Cathay Pacific since China is using simplified Chinese characters ? 😊

#35 Chris Tan

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 08:08 AM

Heard the paint job was done in China.
Could this be the simplified version of Cathay Pacific since China is using simplified Chinese characters ? 😊

Or it could be CXs obsession with removing F.

(Joke stolen from FlyerTalk)

#36 KK Lee

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 04:42 PM

Jet Airways: Passengers hurt as pilots 'forget' cabin pressure

More than 30 Indian passengers, some bleeding from their noses and ears, have received treatment after pilots 'forgot' to turn on a switch regulating cabin pressure, officials said.

https://www.bbc.com/...-india-45584300

This is what divers tried to avoid.

#37 KK Lee

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 04:44 AM

What do passengers steal from planes? Anything that isnt bolted down.

Among the items snatched from commercial flights: coffee mugs, cutlery, blankets and life jackets.

Life jackets? Yes, life jackets.

When Joyce Kirby worked as a flight attendant, she says, passengers routinely grabbed the emergency flotation devices under their seats before exiting the aircraft. We had to check each seat after each flight to make sure each one had a vest, recalls Kirby, who now runs a tour operation in Palm Coast, Fla.

But the what isnt as interesting as the why. If passengers are taking everything they can carry when they leave planes, it may say more about the airline industry than it does about them.

Not long ago, I took a hard look at the problem of disappearing hotel amenities. Experts suggested that hotel resort fees which leave guests with the impression that everything is included may be to blame for a rise in thefts. The airline problem is similar. Fees are everywhere, and travelers dont always have a choice about paying them. Theyre stealing stuff because theyre angry.

How much do passengers steal from planes? No one knows. There are no recent surveys on airline theft, and airlines dont publicly report thefts. But theres plenty of anecdotal evidence from my readers and from colleagues like Brian Sumers, a writer for the online trade publication Skift, who recently observed that passengers were stealing upgraded amenities such as pillows and blankets from first class.

United Airlines last year reportedly sent a memo to flight attendants noting some confusion about which amenities may be taken off the plane at the end of the flight. The pillows and blankets in first class, it said, dont come with the flight. Even if only a small number of these items are taken off each flight, that can quickly add up to millions of dollars across our network over the course of a year, the memo warned.

Lets quickly review the items people normally lift from planes.

Airsickness bags: Travelers like Clemens Sehi collect them. Its kind of a tradition for me to take the bags with me as a souvenir, he says. He has collected 250 bags from 50 countries, including some from airlines that now are defunct. His most prized barf bag is from Aero Lloyd, a German airline that shut down in 2003. Sehi, a creative director and writer from Berlin, doesnt consider taking these bags to be stealing.

Table settings: I spoke with several passengers who admitted to taking forks, knives, spoons, glassware and salt and pepper shakers. This is more of a gray area. Obviously, plastic dishware is fine to take, but regular table settings are normally a no-no. When it doubt, ask. Thats what Valerio Violo, a civil engineer from Copenhagen, did on a recent Lufthansa flight. When I asked the flight attendant if I could buy the coffee mugs, she gave me two, he recalls. Theyre actually very nice.

Pillows and blankets: Simah Etgar doesnt have a problem with taking the blankets on her flights. It is, she says, good thieving because she donates the blankets to her school in a low-income area of Raisinghnagar, India, where she teaches English. Indeed, some airlines, including JetBlue, sell the blankets to passengers outright rather than offering them for use during the flight. But as a general rule, you can keep the blankets unless a flight attendant tells you that you cant, either with a spoken notice (Flight attendants will now collect your pillows and blankets) or a written one, such as a card in your amenity kit.

These are hardly the only items passengers steal from planes. Some stolen items are surprising because its unclear what the passengers will do with them. That includes warning placards (Life Vest Under Your Seat), tray tables and, as one flight attendant told me, the wings right off my uniform blazer, which was in the aisle seat.

Okay, stealing a flight attendants wings that crosses a line.

So whats behind the in-flight thefts? Blame the increasingly frayed relationship between passenger and airline. A generation ago, when tickets were a little more expensive, they included a lot of things, like the ability to check a bag, reserve a seat and enjoy a decent meal. Today, everything is extra, and that irks some passengers, who feel that the airline is taking advantage of them. Stealing a cup or a life jacket is payback.

Passengers sometimes have a right to feel exploited. When the airline charges exorbitant prices for bland airline meals, its easy to justify pilfering a bag of pretzels from the galley. Likewise, when a carrier charges five figures for a premium seat, you might assume the pillows and blankets are included.

I think taking things from airplanes is more of a moral choice than anything, says Andrew Mondia, an actor based in Toronto. Like most passengers, he already knows what hes allowed to take, and what he isnt. Just in case: If its disposable, you can take it. If not, just ask.

Theres a way to stop airline passengers and hotel guests from stealing, but it could be expensive. Make the travel experience fair and as free of fees as possible. Dont hold your breath for that to happen, though. These are industries that became enormously profitable by bending the truth and inventing surcharges. Its unlikely theyll give that up.

https://www.washingt...m=.061b4e66cab9

#38 Shazmiey

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 12:26 PM

What do passengers steal from planes? Anything that isnt bolted down.

Among the items snatched from commercial flights: coffee mugs, cutlery, blankets and life jackets.

Life jackets? Yes, life jackets.

When Joyce Kirby worked as a flight attendant, she says, passengers routinely grabbed the emergency flotation devices under their seats before exiting the aircraft. We had to check each seat after each flight to make sure each one had a vest, recalls Kirby, who now runs a tour operation in Palm Coast, Fla.

But the what isnt as interesting as the why. If passengers are taking everything they can carry when they leave planes, it may say more about the airline industry than it does about them.

Not long ago, I took a hard look at the problem of disappearing hotel amenities. Experts suggested that hotel resort fees which leave guests with the impression that everything is included may be to blame for a rise in thefts. The airline problem is similar. Fees are everywhere, and travelers dont always have a choice about paying them. Theyre stealing stuff because theyre angry.

How much do passengers steal from planes? No one knows. There are no recent surveys on airline theft, and airlines dont publicly report thefts. But theres plenty of anecdotal evidence from my readers and from colleagues like Brian Sumers, a writer for the online trade publication Skift, who recently observed that passengers were stealing upgraded amenities such as pillows and blankets from first class.

United Airlines last year reportedly sent a memo to flight attendants noting some confusion about which amenities may be taken off the plane at the end of the flight. The pillows and blankets in first class, it said, dont come with the flight. Even if only a small number of these items are taken off each flight, that can quickly add up to millions of dollars across our network over the course of a year, the memo warned.

Lets quickly review the items people normally lift from planes.

Airsickness bags: Travelers like Clemens Sehi collect them. Its kind of a tradition for me to take the bags with me as a souvenir, he says. He has collected 250 bags from 50 countries, including some from airlines that now are defunct. His most prized barf bag is from Aero Lloyd, a German airline that shut down in 2003. Sehi, a creative director and writer from Berlin, doesnt consider taking these bags to be stealing.

Table settings: I spoke with several passengers who admitted to taking forks, knives, spoons, glassware and salt and pepper shakers. This is more of a gray area. Obviously, plastic dishware is fine to take, but regular table settings are normally a no-no. When it doubt, ask. Thats what Valerio Violo, a civil engineer from Copenhagen, did on a recent Lufthansa flight. When I asked the flight attendant if I could buy the coffee mugs, she gave me two, he recalls. Theyre actually very nice.

Pillows and blankets: Simah Etgar doesnt have a problem with taking the blankets on her flights. It is, she says, good thieving because she donates the blankets to her school in a low-income area of Raisinghnagar, India, where she teaches English. Indeed, some airlines, including JetBlue, sell the blankets to passengers outright rather than offering them for use during the flight. But as a general rule, you can keep the blankets unless a flight attendant tells you that you cant, either with a spoken notice (Flight attendants will now collect your pillows and blankets) or a written one, such as a card in your amenity kit.

These are hardly the only items passengers steal from planes. Some stolen items are surprising because its unclear what the passengers will do with them. That includes warning placards (Life Vest Under Your Seat), tray tables and, as one flight attendant told me, the wings right off my uniform blazer, which was in the aisle seat.

Okay, stealing a flight attendants wings that crosses a line.

So whats behind the in-flight thefts? Blame the increasingly frayed relationship between passenger and airline. A generation ago, when tickets were a little more expensive, they included a lot of things, like the ability to check a bag, reserve a seat and enjoy a decent meal. Today, everything is extra, and that irks some passengers, who feel that the airline is taking advantage of them. Stealing a cup or a life jacket is payback.

Passengers sometimes have a right to feel exploited. When the airline charges exorbitant prices for bland airline meals, its easy to justify pilfering a bag of pretzels from the galley. Likewise, when a carrier charges five figures for a premium seat, you might assume the pillows and blankets are included.

I think taking things from airplanes is more of a moral choice than anything, says Andrew Mondia, an actor based in Toronto. Like most passengers, he already knows what hes allowed to take, and what he isnt. Just in case: If its disposable, you can take it. If not, just ask.

Theres a way to stop airline passengers and hotel guests from stealing, but it could be expensive. Make the travel experience fair and as free of fees as possible. Dont hold your breath for that to happen, though. These are industries that became enormously profitable by bending the truth and inventing surcharges. Its unlikely theyll give that up.

https://www.washingt...m=.061b4e66cab9

Reminds me of those good years when you can get cool collection of playing cards, postcards, pen, etc for free, nowadays, you need to buy these items. 



#39 Kee Hooi Yen

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 03:34 PM

The airlines even give away aeroplane models when you ask for it !

Edited by Kee Hooi Yen, 14 October 2018 - 03:35 PM.


#40 Mushrif A

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 03:37 PM

Reminds me of those good years when you can get cool collection of playing cards, postcards, pen, etc for free, nowadays, you need to buy these items. 


Hence, if you want to time-travel, fly on SQ.




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