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MAS and AirAsia Shares Swap

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MAS has a staff base of 20,477 as per its 2011 annual report.

 

While the number is large, the cost may not be so as MAS staff are mostly underpaid compared to similar positions in other airlines.

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This MH 380 flying to Sydney issue is getting ludicrous

First you have MH lobbying for AK-X to be denied rights into SYD, supposedly because the market is not big enough for MH's dugong and AK-X

Then came the share swap and AK-X was allowed in - everyone crooning about different market segments, growing demand and all that sort of hurrah

Now share swap has been snuffed out, SYD is not big enough for the dugong again

 

If ever one need evidence of shrunken balls at MAS ........ :D

 

Shrunken balls - or balls squeezed by invisible hands in the Red camp again?

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In airline industry, aircraft utilization doesn’t necessary means meeting customers demand. While MH was serving EWR, unlike SQ, the flight was turnaround within 3 hours hence either departure or arrival time was unconventional, and resulted in poor load and yield. QF don’t park 4 whale jets for over 8 hours at LHR, SYD and MEL for no reason. It seems the AJ don’t have a clue on attracting pax.

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..... or balls squeezed by invisible hands in the Red camp again?

Different methodology, same nett effect, still shrunken :D

 

 

 

In airline industry, aircraft utilization doesn’t necessary means meeting customers demand

.........

It seems the AJ don’t have a clue on attracting pax.

I guess that sort of approach does work for LCC's where your average pax is willing to trade travelling cheap (perceived only?) against doing so at some very unsociable hours of the day

Thing is, MAS seem again being drawn into a fixation to rehash whatever the red one is doing for their own ops

Not that it's a bad thing imitating success, but at least know what and why it works for the competitor first !

Edited by BC Tam

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I guess that sort of approach does work for LCC's where your average pax is willing to trade travelling cheap (perceived only?) against doing so at some very unsociable hours of the day

What is wrong with getting better returns on assets? SQ and CX has been doing this for a long long time!

 

Working your aircraft harder means you do not need to buy so many aircraft, just to let them idle their time away. MH is still far away from AK - their B737s (according to AJ) now fly for 9 hours per day while AK fly their A320s 18 hours a day (according to TF). So MH is only doing half the number of hours as AK.

 

That means that if AK has 50 aircraft, MH will need 100. Buying 100 aircraft means securing financing and paying interest on them. All that will increase operational costs.

 

Even by extending MH's B737s operations to 11 hours a day, MH is still not getting the same return on assets as AK. It is merely trying to reduce its CASK to a more acceptable level. If there is one thing positive about MH's management, it is good that they have gotten rid of their fixation with LCCs.

 

In airline industry, aircraft utilization doesn’t necessary means meeting customers demand. While MH was serving EWR, unlike SQ, the flight was turnaround within 3 hours hence either departure or arrival time was unconventional, and resulted in poor load and yield. QF don’t park 4 whale jets for over 8 hours at LHR, SYD and MEL for no reason. It seems the AJ don’t have a clue on attracting pax.

I think MH does practice yield management nowadays - popular (high demand) flights tend to cost more while less popular flights are priced lower. Yes, MH should give incentives to pax to fly at odd hours. The Middle Eastern airlines have shown that if you put the fare low enough, people will endure the inconvenience (even to the extent of transiting in the Middle East) to save some money.

 

While the number is large, the cost may not be so as MAS staff are mostly underpaid compared to similar positions in other airlines.

I do not think numbers are important. What is more important is whether these employees are doing a fair job for a fair wage. There is nothing wrong with cutting out employees who do nothing but spend their time idling. Likewise, there is nothing wrong with paying them more, if they are productive and highly skilled.

 

I think MH should do well to improve their training of staff. Some of them really do look like dead wood. They turn up for work but they really don't know what they are supposed to be doing! I think that a number of cases have been highlighted in this forum in the past. As for cabin crew, I find that they are not knowledgeable on things like food allergies that pax may be suffering from. As such more training will enable the staff to improve their standards of work.

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What is wrong with getting better returns on assets? SQ and CX has been doing this for a long long time!

My apologies if I gave you the wrong impression - I was trying to refer specifically on KK's bit on QF's habit of idling their dugong's time away at certain airports :)

 

 

The Middle Eastern airlines have shown that if you put the fare low enough, people will endure the inconvenience (even to the extent of transiting in the Middle East) to save some money.

Heck yes ! The key is 'value for money' - not necessarily cheap(est) :)

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..... AK fly their A320s 18 hours a day (according to TF)

13 hours a day according to incoming CEO :)

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My apologies if I gave you the wrong impression - I was trying to refer specifically on KK's bit on QF's habit of idling their dugong's time away at certain airports :)

 

 

SQ keeps a 773 overnight at SYD.

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I remember reading a trip report on A.net that MH A330 flew back to KUL from PER empty without pax (to avoid paying parking fees?) after dropping pax in PER.

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the B737 aircraft's flying hours would be extended from the current nine to 11,

Is this the current most updated daily utilization rate of their 737 ? They have so many 737... the actual daily utilization could be less than 9 hrs/day... :pardon:

 

 

While the number is large, the cost may not be so as MAS staff are mostly underpaid compared to similar positions in other airlines.

Perhaps it's time to identify who should be let go and at the same time, to give a raise to staffs that are retained :)

 

 

In airline industry, aircraft utilization doesn’t necessary means meeting customers demand. While MH was serving EWR, unlike SQ, the flight was turnaround within 3 hours hence either departure or arrival time was unconventional, and resulted in poor load and yield. QF don’t park 4 whale jets for over 8 hours at LHR, SYD and MEL for no reason. It seems the AJ don’t have a clue on attracting pax.

Agreed. SQ parks their 388 (previously a 744) at JFK for more than 9 hours before flying it back to SIN via FRA everyday.

 

 

What is wrong with getting better returns on assets? SQ and CX has been doing this for a long long time!

Both SQ and CX don't have many flights that leave around 1am and arrive at the destination around 4am anymore. Such flight timings are restricted to those cities where they are big enough and offer plenty of flights a day to give more choices to their customers.

 

 

SQ keeps a 773 overnight at SYD.

CX has their aircraft overnighting at a few airports other than HKG for their passenger aircraft too... but i forgot at which airports already.

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CX has their aircraft overnighting at a few airports other than HKG for their passenger aircraft too... but i forgot at which airports already.

PEN ?

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PEN ?

Yeah, that's one. And i think they also got one aircraft "sleeps" at KLIA too every night. The flight arrives at KLIA around 7.55pm and only flies back to HKG at 9.25 the next motning. That's more than 12 hours of sleep at the Satellite Terminal :D

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Yeah, that's one. And i think they also got one aircraft "sleeps" at KLIA too every night. The flight arrives at KLIA around 7.55pm and only flies back to HKG at 9.25 the next motning. That's more than 12 hours of sleep at the Satellite Terminal :D

 

CX also sleeps their planes in TPE....around 3-4 birds sleep there daily

Also, in ICN and NRT, CX sleep at least 1 bird overnite

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How about new airlines MAS short haul, still on going? Found this illustrator for short haul named as "MAS".

 

mas738n.jpg

 

I don't think MAS is a go, but this does answer the question where the red went from the A380 livery if it's true.

Edited by Mohd Suhaimi Fariz

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Yes this must have been a study for the short haul premium airline.

 

Anyway, I think that overall strategy seems to be correct (even if by accident!) - they need to stop the heavy bleeding first. Now they are consolidating and looking for some stability, focussing on boosting revenue. Following that, the next phase will be more painful - rightsizing the workforce and other assets.

 

If they can manage to do that well, then the future will look pretty good. They can then think about expanding again, with a new regional airline or a JV LCC, e.g. JetStar Malaysia or maybe even with Lion Air?.

Edited by flee

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I remember reading a trip report on A.net that MH A330 flew back to KUL from PER empty without pax (to avoid paying parking fees?) after dropping pax in PER.

Might well be - the fuel and crew costs may be lower than the parking charges... ;)

 

Well, reading between the lines, I won't be surprised if MH deploys the new A330s to be delivered this year on the SYD route too - they have said that the A380 is too large and the B747s and B777s are not so economical!

Edited by flee

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While the number is large, the cost may not be so as MAS staff are mostly underpaid compared to similar positions in other airlines.

 

Not entirely correct Captain.

 

Salary is but one component of staff costs. There's EPF, Socso, Insurance, Medical, Transport, uniform and training allocation as well as other misc components.

 

MAS is actually an HR nightmare, which to me is the root of all its problems. Not having the right people in the right place is its biggest problem. Not revenue, not costs. Its a people problem. From the top downwards.

Right people in the right place and everything will run like clockwork.

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MAS must win back customers it lost to other carriers due to price competition

 

Yesterday must have been a busy day for those at Malaysia Airlines (MAS). They were once again briefed on yet another business plan to chart its journey ahead.

 

To some, the new plan was no different from the one crafted in December, and it lacked details on the implementation.

 

The reality is, there is a slight difference in the sense that the return to profitability timeline has been pushed a year later to 2014 and the airline will continue to operate its long and short-haul business under one roof instead of separately.

 

This new plan which MAS group CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya says is a “renewed plan'' is about cost cuts and revenue generation. MAS has come to realise that it needs to sweat its assets and earn more as it cannot be on life support forever.

 

There is a 6.3 sen gap between its revenue per seat km and cost per available seat per km. Its revenue per seat km basis is 18.5 sen, as per its 2011 annual report, and its cost per available seat km is 24.8 sen. With the new plan, MAS hopes to rev up revenue and cost on a per-seat-km basis by 10% and 20% (or 5 sen) respectively.

 

The question is, can it generate the revenue it needs and bring cost down when its cost are somewhat fixed?

 

Jauhari told his people the strategy is to win back customers. That would involve the need to revamp MAS commercial team (though parts of it is already in process), review its sales and distribution efforts, fix corporate travel, revamp the internet booking engine, enhance branding and grow ancillary income like excess baggage fees.

 

From the operational side, he wants to realign the network based on demand and profitability, and increase aircraft utilisation. Staff productivity levels should then go up, which will then increase the airline's efficiency. Other measures include a review and revamp of legacy process, as the decision-making process currently involves several layers. If work can be done in-house, there would be less reliance on vendors. The airline also plans to overhaul procurement and fine comb each and every contract that has been inked.

 

These were some of the suggestions the MAS unions and associations gave management to turnaround the airline.

 

MAS is often said to have a bloated workforce and cost cuts should ideally involved jobs cuts. But Jauhari is steering clear of this sensitive topic. MAS has 20,477 employees and its staff cost is its third largest expenditure after fuel and other cost. Those familiar with the matter claim that eventually there will be “some alignment; it is a question of timing.”

 

But for now, the need to rev up revenues is critical. In order to to do that, MAS wants to expand its network instead of shrinking it. Asia remains its playground and MAS will fly to new destinations and add more frequencies to existing routes. Increasing frequencies is necessary with MAS becoming a One-World member by year end as it would need to feed traffic, says a source.

 

It is learnt that MAS will expand further into Japan, China, India, South Asia, and Asean. Those in the know claim that MAS may form a code share though it is still in talks with Air Mauritius to offer connectivity into Johannesburg and Cape Town, as it had earlier pulled out of these stops.

 

The new points it is looking to add include Sapparo, Haneda (it is not known how MAS is going to get rights for this and why it wants to reinstate this route when it axed it earlier this year), Chengdu, Wuhan, Ahmedabad, Kochi and even Calcutta. It may add frequencies to Jakarta, Manila, and to points in Laos and Vietnam, among others, those in the know say.

 

“MAS also plans to mount flights into Katmandu in Nepal in December this year,'' they say.

 

Apart from optimising its aircraft usage, especially the B737, it is learnt that MAS plans to limit aircraft used to three, namely A380, A330 and B737-800. It will return the other aircraft types including the B777 provided it can be modelled after the A330, to carry more fuel to do the 12-hour flying radius instead of the existing nine hours. With that, it can be used for the European sector, they say.

 

Winning customers

MAS' end game - boost sales to bring in the income.

 

That job is now in the hands of Duncan Bureau, the new head of sales. Early indications are that he is “savvy and knows the industry well.” It is a positive but the challenge is to “price it right” as for now, experts say MAS has “priced (its fares) out of the market.”

 

“It has to benchmark itself against carriers like Emirates, Etihad, Qatar Airways and even Singapore Airlines. MAS has to win back some of its customer that have gone to these carriers because of fare pricing.

 

“If you are in trouble and want to rev up revenue, you have to be in the competition and fill the aircraft instead of sticking to high fares. The emphasis going forward should be to fill the aircraft and generate as much revenue as possible, as it is better to get something rather than not get anything at all. People not on corporate travel are more price conscious and they do not mind waiting two to four hours at the airport in order to save on fare.

 

“Being premium does not mean that you can price yourself out of the market,” says the expert.

The fare strategy aside, some are wondering why MAS is not riding on the A380 to communicate to travellers the selling proposition of this new beauty.

 

“We are baffled with their communications strategy. The A380 commercial flight is on July 1 but it is not shouting the good things about its A380, where the flat beds are much bigger than its competitors, the virtually noise free headphones, its in-flight entertainment, its service and its glorious food,” says an expert.

 

“MAS should, by now, be drumming home the differences between their A380 and that of their competitors, namely, SIA, the Emirates and Qatar Airways. Why not highlight the pluses and get the market excited,” he adds.

 

Those in the know claim that MAS' load factor for the A380 for the first month is more than 90% due to the summer holidays, the Euro 2012, and the fact that traditionally, this is a busy period.

 

MAS, which recently took delivery of its first A380, returned it to Toulouse, France to get its economy seats re-configured from four to three seaters. That in itself has got some people wondering why the fit-out was not done prior to taking delivery, which is the industry norm. However, those in the know claim that there was a late booking for the seats, which resulted in the delay. Hence, the aircraft had to be re-configured. That exercise involves the burning of extra fuel at a time when the airline is trying to keep cost down.

 

That aside, those in the know claim that MAS may get its second A380 ahead of schedule from end-August to mid-August. MAS could be using the second A380 for its London route too, making it a daily service compared to the current thrice weekly schedule.

 

Source: http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/6/23/business/11536453&sec=business

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It's tough, but MAS can pull through

 

FOR close to a decade now, national carrier Malaysia Airlines (MAS) has been telling more of its stories in the finance lingo - wide asset unbundling (WAU), oil price hedging and the cancelled share swap with AirAsia included.

 

Not that financial matters are unimportant to an airline, but its primary source of income, the passengers, was growing a bit tired, including of waiting for such things as when MAS will provide flat beds in its long-haul business-class cabins when others have done so long before.

 

Stories of it being one of the world's best provider of service to air travellers have since come far in between. Instead, the last five years have seen the airline flying in and out of turbulence, as it struggled with widening losses, an injured pride and a myriad of other issues, some remotely related to keeping its planes in the air.

 

So occupied had it been with these issues that MAS just woke up one day to find itself almost overwhelmed by sometimes-friend-sometimes-foe low-cost carrier AirAsia, at least in terms of visibility.

 

MAS' new chief executive officer (CEO) Ahmad Jauhari Yahya described how he felt out of place at the Kuching Airport which was filled with items carrying the AirAsia brand. "Where is MAS?" he asked himself.

 

Now that Ahmad Jauhari is in the captain's seat, he has access to a wide array of instruments to tell him how MAS is doing and a casual talk session with the new CEO on Thursday indicates that he is the type who believes that if MAS has to bite the bullet to stay aloft, it will bite the bullet.

 

But at the same time, he appears as a CEO who is willing to meet with dissenting parties halfway, the influential unions, eight of them altogether, included.

 

Unions and transport utilities, be they air, sea or land, are inseparable. Many airlines, including great names like Qantas, Lufthansa and British Airways, have at one time or another incurred wraths of their unions, sometimes resulting in the grounding of their planes.

 

Ahmad Jauhari said despite the latest episode when MAS unions flexed their muscles in venting their displeasure at the share-swap exercise with AirAsia, he still believes that they are largely supportive of moves to nurse the national carrier back to profitability.

 

A change in mindset and work culture are, however, required. MAS must be a profit-oriented commercial enterprise, he said, adding that the number one priority now is to increase its revenue.

The airline will continue to improve on both staff productivity and operational efficiency. For one, old jet-fuel guzzlers like the early generation Boeing 747s are on their way out, to be replaced with more modern and fuel-efficient jetliners.

 

From next month, it will start commercial flight of the latest addition to its fleet, the behemoth Airbus A380. MAS hopes that the plane, with a passenger capacity of almost twice that of the B747, will be a game changer.

 

It will also take a closer look at passenger traffic with the view of allocating the most appropriate planes where demand for such are the highest, to maximise revenue.

 

Route rationalisation will be an ongoing thing. MAS will fly only to places where it can make a decent profit. In destinations where it has no intention of sending its planes to, the airline will depend on alliances with other carriers such as through the OneWorld programme.

 

If the recent passenger growth figures provided by the International Air Transport Authority (IATA) is anything to go by, it is highly likely that MAS will be focusing on East Asia, at least for the foreseeable future.

 

But still, Ahmad Jauhari was also aware of other issues not directly under the airline's control that could act as a dangerous windshear to MAS, at the top of which would be the global oil prices. Fuel hedging will thus still be an important aspect of running the airline.

 

IATA figures show how airline margins were sheared by the persistently high jet-fuel prices in 2011 when during that year, although airline revenue were up by 9.4 per cent to US$598 billion (RM1.9 trillion), profit fell by half from 2010 to US$7.9 billion (RM25 billion). MAS itself reported a net loss of RM2.524 billion in 2011.

 

In 2011, the average price per barrel of jet fuel was US$125.54, compared with US$121.3 in 2008. Ahmad Jauhari said airline owners do not expect jet fuel prices to dip below US$120 (RM382) per barrel anymore.

 

Meanwhile, competition is expected to be stiff, especially in far east and southeast asian regions. More planes were sold to airlines in the regions than anywhere else in the world and these planes will be competing with MAS for passengers.

 

But if last Thursday's shareholders meeting is an indicator, shareholders are largely still behind the airline and will support efforts to turn it around.

 

And so too is support from the financial community as Ahmad Jauhari said there were enquiries from potential lenders outside of Kumpulan Wang Amanah Pencen (KWAP) for the second tranche (RM1.5 billion) of its recently announced perpetuity Islamic bond. KWAP has subscribed to the first RM1.5 billion.

 

Source: http://www.btimes.co...masair/Article/

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It will return the other aircraft types including the B777 provided it can be modelled after the A330, to carry more fuel to do the 12-hour flying radius instead of the existing nine hours. With that, it can be used for the European sector, they say.

 

Is it possible for the A330 to have the current MH B772 range without penalizing payload?

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Apart from optimising its aircraft usage, especially the B737, it is learnt that MAS plans to limit aircraft used to three, namely A380, A330 and B737-800. It will return the other aircraft types including the B777 provided it can be modelled after the A330, to carry more fuel to do the 12-hour flying radius instead of the existing nine hours. With that, it can be used for the European sector, they say.

I don't quite get this. To be modelled after the A330 ? Anyway, there is no way the 333 can do KL-Europe nonstop without severe payload penalty. Else i think many other airlines such as SQ and TG, both of which operate more 333 than MAS would have done it by now.

 

If they get rid of their strong 17x 772ER, then eventually MAS will operate only 21x widebodied aircraft (6x 388 and 15x 333). Oh no... :shok:

 

 

Winning customers

MAS' end game - boost sales to bring in the income.

 

That job is now in the hands of Duncan Bureau, the new head of sales. Early indications are that he is “savvy and knows the industry well.” It is a positive but the challenge is to “price it right” as for now, experts say MAS has “priced (its fares) out of the market.”

 

“It has to benchmark itself against carriers like Emirates, Etihad, Qatar Airways and even Singapore Airlines. MAS has to win back some of its customer that have gone to these carriers because of fare pricing.

 

“If you are in trouble and want to rev up revenue, you have to be in the competition and fill the aircraft instead of sticking to high fares. The emphasis going forward should be to fill the aircraft and generate as much revenue as possible, as it is better to get something rather than not get anything at all. People not on corporate travel are more price conscious and they do not mind waiting two to four hours at the airport in order to save on fare.

 

“Being premium does not mean that you can price yourself out of the market,” says the expert.

The fare strategy aside, some are wondering why MAS is not riding on the A380 to communicate to travellers the selling proposition of this new beauty.

Totally agree with him on this! Take a return Business Class ticket from BKI to CDG/LHR for example, MAS is the most expensive.

 

For travels between August 2012 - October 2012

1. KLM - around RM15,100

2. Dragonair/Cathay Pacific - between RM15,000 to RM16,000

2. Etihad - around RM16,256

3. Silkair/SIA - RM20,252

4. MAS - more than RM24,000

All fares displayed are inclusive of fuel surcharges and taxes. MAS air fare is anything but competitive!

 

 

“We are baffled with their communications strategy. The A380 commercial flight is on July 1 but it is not shouting the good things about its A380, where the flat beds are much bigger than its competitors, the virtually noise free headphones, its in-flight entertainment, its service and its glorious food,” says an expert.

Some probably... EK, AF, LH only.

Edited by Isaac

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These guys seem to have no brains and no clue about how to manage an airline. As someone mentioned earlier, the A380 draw factor is what will bring in the customers. They have to do some form of marketing!

However, I suspect that they have now realised how underwhelming their product is compared to SQ and EK A380. Hence the lack of interest to fly SYD. Good luck in using 6 dugongs to London. Probably half will be parked in the apron for show to the other airlines serving KUL.

maybe we can turn them into restaurants like the PIA 707 in kelana jaya (sadly scrapped many years ago).

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MAS Needs Cash To Succeed With Turnaround Plan

 

KUALA LUMPUR, June 23 (Bernama) -- The question many people ask now is whether Malaysia Airlines (MAS) can undertake a turnaround within its targeted timeframe, and the options available to ensure the national carrier continues to fly without having to contend with a financial turbulence time and again.

 

If its latest turnaround plan goes according to plan and achieves the desired results, it is possible for the airline to return to the black, but this will require a lot of cash, according to MIDF Research analyst, Imran Yassin Md Yusof.

 

"MAS needs cash in order to move forward to rebuild its brand name and consolidate its financial structure to ensure it remains competitive among other regional players," he told Bernama.

 

Privatisation of MAS is another way to restore the position of the national carrier, he said, adding, that now is the best time to do so as its share price is cheap.

 

MAS on Thursday announced its target to return to profitability by 2014, which was an extension of a year from its turnaround plan announced in December last year.

 

Imran Yassin said further stability in the global economy would help the turnaround plan.

 

Despite its financial woes, he said MAS was still relevant as its plays a major role in spurring growth in related activities such as aircraft maintenance, repair and operations businesses, leasing aircraft as well as the tourism industry.

 

He said that its top management needs to further bolster efforts to save the airline by focusing on its niche business.

 

He said MAS as a full services carrier should focus on attracting more passengers for its business and first class seats, which generate a higher yield compared to the economy class, which are more price sensitive.

 

"When we compare MAS with its peers, the cost structure is just about the same. However, in terms of revenue, MAS does not match them, and this is one main reason why it is still lagging behind," he added.

 

MAS, he said, also lags in terms of services and products.

 

Citing an example, he said Emirates Airlines offers a very competitive fare, but at the same time the product offering was better than MAS, like flight entertainment with 100 television channels.

 

Comparing MAS and AirAsia, he said their business strategy is different and therefore any comparison is unfair.

 

"Although in terms of flights, some costs are about the same, their target market and pricing strategy are different," he added.

 

Nevertheless, Imran Yassin said MAS can still learn from AirAsia which has performed well in areas such as cost control, mitigating high fuel costs as well as ways to attract customers.

 

He said the collaboration between MAS and Malaysia Airports Holdings Bhd (MAHB) should also be strengthened to offer extra services to the business and first class passengers.

 

"They will not care much about the pricing if we can offer them extra when compared with others.

 

"MAS therefore needs to work closely with MAHB to upgrade its services and to offer extra services, especially for transit passengers at the airport," he added.

 

On the idea of privatising MAS, he said this can be another way to save and help the airline.

 

By privatising MAS to any Malaysian conglomerate, it would be possible to do what is necessary for the turnaround and rebuild the airline out of the public eye, he added.

 

He also believes that now is the best time for any MAS privatisation, following the current lower share price.

 

"In terms of ringgit and sen, the price of privatisation now can be cheaper, rather than later," he said.

 

Imran Yassin added that if MAS makes a recovery, the share would likely move up to between RM2 to RM3 per share.

 

On Friday, the share price of MAS closed a sen higher at RM1.14.

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