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Airbus Reveals A320 NEO

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Airbus starts final assembly of best-selling A320neo

 

800x600_1395046535_FAL_A320neo__station_

 

A320neo programme on-track for first flight in Q4 2014
17 MARCH 2014 PRESS RELEASE
Airbus has started final assembly of the first A320neo at its Final Assembly Line (FAL) in Toulouse (France), with the join-up of the forward and aft fuselage sections which recently arrived from St. Nazaire in France and Hamburg in Germany respectively.
Once this phase is completed, the next stage is the wing to fuselage join-up. Overall it takes about one month to complete the final assembly of an A320 Family aircraft. On average, every seven hours an A320 Family aircraft leaves one of the three A320 Family FAL’s in Toulouse, Hamburg, or Tianjin.
The A320neo first flight will take place in Q4 2014 and first delivery in Q4 2015. The A320neo “new engine option” incorporates many innovations, including latest generation engines and large Sharklet wing-tip devices, which together deliver 15 percent in fuel savings and a reduction of 3,600 tonnes of C02 per aircraft per year. With a total of more than 2,600 orders received from 50 customers since its launch in 2010, the A320neo Family has captured some 60 percent of the market, clearly demonstrating its leadership.
Source: Airbus

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Pratt & Whitney Ships Initial PurePower Engines To Airbus
EAST HARTFORD, Conn., Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Pratt & Whitney has delivered its first ship set of PurePower® PW1100G-JM engines on schedule to Airbus for its A320neo aircraft family. The PurePower engines were assembled and tested at the company's West Palm Beach, Florida, facility – one of three locations that will assemble PW1100G-JM engines for Airbus. Pratt & Whitney is a division of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX).
"Airbus put its trust in Pratt & Whitney to design, develop and certify the PW1100G-JM engine for the A320neo," said David Brantner, president, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engines. "I am pleased to say that Pratt & Whitney has completed more than 75 percent of certification testing and we are on track to meet or exceed all commitments. Our PurePower engine family has now completed more than 9,000 hours of rigorous testing, which is proving the engine's capability and reliability. We are on track and ready to power the first A320neo aircraft in late summer."
The PW1100G-JM engine continues to go through its rigorous testing process with certification planned for the second half of 2014. Airline operation or entry into service is planned for the fourth quarter of 2015.
The PW1100G-JM engine successfully completed its first development flight May 15, 2013, on Pratt & Whitney's flight test aircraft. To date, the company has successfully completed more than 20 development engine builds and three flight test campaigns to validate the PW1100G-JM engine. The first engine was tested in November 2012, less than two years after the Geared Turbofan program was launched.
Compared with an A320ceo without Sharklets, the A320neo powered by PW1100G-JM engine technology will provide customers with up to a 15 percent reduction in fuel-burn with a corresponding reduction in CO2 emissions. The PW1100G-JM engine also provides up to a 75 percent reduction in the A320neo noise footprint, which is also environmentally friendly and allows longer hours of operation at airports that operate under curfew.
To date, the PurePower engine family has more than 5,500 orders and commitments, including options, from more than 50 global customers.

Pratt & Whitney Unveils Higher Thrust PurePower® Engine
EAST HARTFORD, Conn., Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Pratt & Whitney today launched the newest addition to the PurePower engine family, the PW1135G-JM engine, a 35,000 thrust class engine for the Airbus A321neo aircraft. The engine's higher thrust makes it the most powerful engine on the A321neo allowing A321neo operators, fitted with Geared Turbofan™ engine technology, to fly routes of greater distance while carrying more passengers or larger payloads when operating out of high-altitude airports. Pratt & Whitney is a division of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX).
"At Pratt & Whitney, we're always working to stay one step ahead with our technology while providing our customers value. The PurePower PW1135G-JM engine is yet another example of this approach," said David Brantner, president, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engines. "With the PW1135G-JM engine, we offer incremental value by opening up new routes without compromising fuel burn, emissions and environmental performance."
The higher thrust offered by the PW1135G-JM engine allows an A321neo operator to benefit from increased range when operating out of high altitude airports, such as Mexico City and Bogota.

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Airbus upbeat on A320neo test progress




Airbus has achieved test instrumentation power-on for its first A320neo, and is conducting load calibration of the aircraft while its Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines undergo podding.


The aircraft is being prepared for ground-vibration tests and will go to the paint facility “in the next few weeks”, says A320neo programme chief Klaus Roewe.


He says the twin-engined aircraft is to be handed to Airbus’s design organisation at the end of August, and first flight is scheduled for September.


There are no concerns about the geared-fan powerplant, following a failure involving the PW1500G engine during Bombardier CSeries testing last month.


Roewe says the A320neo’s engine is “different” and that its test-bed is not facing “any compromise or limitation”.


“We don’t see a risk to first flight,” he adds.


A320neo project flight-test engineer Sandra Bour-Schaeffer says that Airbus wants to achieve the same take-off and landing performance as the A320 despite the re-engined version’s being 1.6t heavier.


She says the sharklet wing-tip campaign has “paved the way” towards A320neo certification, adding that it has generated some 250h of up-front flight testing.


But she adds that, while the upgrade from the A320 is technically relatively straightforward, the certification regime has changed substantially since the A320 was approved.


Bour-Schaeffer says that, while the A350 has a test fleet of five aircraft, the airframer “can’t afford” to produce the same for the A320neo family range.


Four A320neo test aircraft will be built – two for each engine option – and Bour-Schaeffer says: “We’ve chosen to certify all engine tests on the A320.”


One aircraft in each pair will have heavy instrumentation and conduct handling and hot-and-high performance tests. The second will be lighter – used for testing autopilot, noise, and extended operations – and be “more representative” to customers with “no intrusive instruments”, Bour-Schaeffer adds.



Each of the two derivative airframes, the A319neo and A321neo, will have only two test aircraft, one for each engine. While several test results can simply be “read across” from the A320neo to the A319neo, owing to their identical wings, tests such as noise assessment have to be repeated for the A321neo. The A321neo will have to undergo a surface-water test, rather than rely on modelling.


Airbus is to conduct a virtual first flight campaign for the A320neo in summer ahead of the maiden sortie.




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Airbus’ first A320neo reaches completion

 

800x600_1404200345_A320_NEO_REVEAL_05.jp

 

Gearing up to first flight in September 2014
1 JULY 2014 PRESS RELEASE
The assembly of Airbus’ first A320neo has been completed following painting of the aircraft and the mounting of Pratt & Whitney PW1100G-JM engines. MSN6101, which will be the first A320neo to fly, will soon start its ground tests to prepare for first flight.
The flight test campaign for the A320neo will kick-off in September 2014, paving the way for Entry Into Service in Q4 2015.
The A320neo “new engine option” incorporates many innovations, including latest generation engines and large Sharklet wing-tip devices, which together deliver 15 percent in fuel savings and a reduction of 3,600 tonnes of C02 per aircraft per year. With a total of nearly 2,700 orders received from more than 50 customers since its launch in 2010, the A320neo Family has captured some 60 percent of the market, clearly demonstrating its leadership.
800x600_1404206906_A320_NEO_REVEAL-.jpg
More photos here:

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Look at the SIZE of those engines!!!

Those engines are massive o.o

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Yes, really makes the A320 look like a baby B772/A350. It should look even better on the A321 - more proportionate.

 

A big fan is how modern engines achieve better efficiency. The high bypass ratio from the big fan can generate more thrust for any given output from the engine core. So the engine produces more thrust with the fan relative to the thrust produced by the core (via the exhaust).


Video:http://www.airbus.com/broadcastroom/page-broadcastroom-detail.php?id=0_rbrwxe68

Edited by flee

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Yes, really makes the A320 look like a baby B772/A350. It should look even better on the A321 - more proportionate.

 

A big fan is how modern engines achieve better efficiency. The high bypass ratio from the big fan can generate more thrust for any given output from the engine core. So the engine produces more thrust with the fan relative to the thrust produced by the core (via the exhaust).

Video:http://www.airbus.com/broadcastroom/page-broadcastroom-detail.php?id=0_rbrwxe68

 

Boeing was claiming bigger diameter engine induced more drag :p

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Boeing was claiming bigger diameter engine induced more drag :p

Boeing is just spreading FUD. Drag is always a problem with aircraft. It is how well you manage it that decides if your aircraft design is efficient enough. The thrust-weight-drag equation is something that all aircraft manufacturers need to balance. If drag was such a big problem for Boeing, why did they have such big engines on the B777?

Next generation aircraft from Airbus will feature engines with big fans - see how big the engine is on the A350

 

web.jpg

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Boeing is just spreading FUD. Drag is always a problem with aircraft. It is how well you manage it that decides if your aircraft design is efficient enough. The thrust-weight-drag equation is something that all aircraft manufacturers need to balance. If drag was such a big problem for Boeing, why did they have such big engines on the B777?

Next generation aircraft from Airbus will feature engines with big fans - see how big the engine is on the A350

 

web.jpg

 

Big engine big drag was a reason given by Boeing before 68.1in fan diameter was selected for 737 Max.

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Big engine big drag was a reason given by Boeing before 68.1in fan diameter was selected for 737 Max.

B737 is compromised by its short undercarriage. Boeing has no choice but to go for the biggest fan that can be fitted within this limitation. Only time will tell whether they have optimised the aerodynamics of the whole aircraft. One advantage the B737 has over the A320 is its low weight. So lower thrust engines is not going to be such a big problem for this aircraft.

 

But yes, saying big fan equals big drag is a kindergarten statement - there is more to it that that.

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Airbus A320neo surpasses 3,000 firm orders

 

15 JULY 2014 PRESS RELEASE

Airbus A320neo (new engine option) Family has reached an important milestone during the Farnborough airshow, having cumulated more than 3,000 firm orders from 57 customers since its launch in December 2010. The milestone was reached when SMBC Aviation Capital ordered 110 A320neo, marking the latest vote confidence for the world’s leading Single Aisle aircraft Family.
“We’ve given customers many reasons to prefer the A320neo Family and our customers have given us 3,000 reasons for making it the world’s favourite and fastest selling single aisle aircraft by far. With 15% reduced fuel burn, an additional 500nm range and the widest most comfortable cabin in its category, the A320neo Family is the single aisle aircraft of choice with 57 customers worldwide – twice as many as the competitor,” said John Leahy, Chief Operating Officer, Customers. “We are honored by SMBC’s vote of confidence in the NEO, and we’re proud that our partnership with them has pushed the A320neo order book beyond 3000.”
Earlier this month, the first A320neo rolled-out of Airbus facilities following its painting and the mounting of its Pratt & Whitney PW1100G-JM engines.
The A320neo incorporates new generation engines and Sharklets (wing tip devices) which together deliver 15 percent in fuel savings. To date, firm orders for the NEO reached 3090 aircraft from 57 customers, representing a 60 per cent market share in its category.
Source: Airbus

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ANALYSIS: Airbus conversions stress shift to larger types

 

Analysis of Airbus’s single-aisle backlog reveals that the shift towards larger types in new orders has been underpinned by substantial conversion activity within existing agreements.
The trend has been evident in gross orders since 2010, when the relatively even balance between the A319 and A321 began to tilt heavily in favour of the larger aircraft. In 2013 the A321 outsold the A319 by a factor of 20.
But less apparent has been the underlying conversion trend over the same period.
There were 98 upward conversions of A319s in 2010, about a quarter of them to A321s. In the same year only 35 A320s were converted to the larger type.
But over the following three years – from 2011 to 2013 – customers converted 323 A320s to A321s, and moved another 90 A319s upwards.

 

 

 

Full analysis: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CB8QqQIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flightglobal.com%2Fnews%2Farticles%2Fanalysis-airbus-conversions-stress-shift-to-larger-402387%2F&ei=oC_iU6-QIYmJuASonoDICQ&usg=AFQjCNF7MYQrbc74kZ_Baet0wQNuMqddZw&bvm=bv.72197243,d.c2E

 

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A320-271N, Airbus Industrie, D-AUBA (MSN 6286) Second NEO airframe spotted in Hamburg..

 

No Engine Option? ;)

 

15157210256_748ff2694c_b.jpg

 

Photo Copyright: xfw-spotter

Edited by flee

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A320-271N, Airbus Industrie, D-AUBA (MSN 6286) Second NEO airframe spotted in Hamburg..

 

No Engine Option? ;)

 

15157210256_748ff2694c_b.jpg

 

Photo Copyright: xfw-spotter

It says "unbeatable fuel efficiency" - not having any engine means it can't get any better than that! :lol:

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It says "unbeatable fuel efficiency" - not having any engine means it can't get any better than that! :lol:

Maybe not quite optimal yet - need to remove the APU also ! :D

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Late Engine Issue May Cause A320neo First Flight Delay

 

Airbus and Pratt & Whitney are believed to be tackling a late-developing certification issue with the PW1100G geared turbofan in an attempt to stave off the looming threat of a delay to the first flight of the re-engined A320neo.

The aircraft manufacturer, which declines to comment, has targeted September for first flight of the A320neo with the Pratt engine but, according to industry sources, may be forced to delay this because of unidentified concerns related to the PW1100G. Airbus had hoped to fly the test aircraft, MSN6101, as early as Sept. 5. However the modified A320neo, which was pictured taxiing under its own power at Toulouse on Sept. 1, remains on the ground.

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Airbus says in final stages of A320neo ground tests

 

Airbus is conducting the final stage of ground trials as it edges towards the keenly-awaited first flight of its revamped A320neo aircraft, the planemaker said on Tuesday.

The first test aircraft is on the "final run-in" towards its maiden flight, a spokesman said in answer to a query, but added it was too early to predict an exact date.
Airbus is sticking to its target for a first flight in the third quarter, or by the end of September, the spokesman said.
Maiden flights need good weather and are usually announced just a few days before they are expected to happen.

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